Anglo-American Foozlers Open

by Aussie Meyer
Solving Tips

Story


Each spring, a special golf cruise makes its way across the Atlantic, delivering avid golfers from bustling New York to tour the bucolic courses of the old country, culminating in a pilgrimage to St. Andrews, Scotland. Arrangements are made for them to compete with their British cousins, loosely matched as to ability, which is how the yankee tourists Cyril Grooley, Gladstone Bott and Bradbury Fisher came to play England's own Rollo Podmarsh and Colonel Bodger.

Now each of these gentlemen had a new trick intended to improve his game! One wore a neck brace to keep him from moving his head. One was using wraparound amber sunglasses to help him keep his eye on the ball. Another golfer had a specially annotated rulebook, with niggling arguments to fit almost any golfing situation. One of them had scientific tools to measure wind and distance, and finally, one had a shiny new lucky niblick.

The spectacle of the tournament was a painful one, for they went 'round the course with scores of: 102, 106, 108, 110 and (sadly) 114 strokes. But certain brave young members of the club formed a sort of spectators gallery, and adopted pet names for each of the competitors: Slosher, Hacker, Gravedigger, Poker and Skippy.

Can you determine, from the five clues below, how the five duffers scored in the tournament, their individual gimmicks, and the affectionate nickname given to each?


./Labels/h_Duffer.png ./Labels/h_Gimmick.png ./Labels/h_Nickname.png
./Labels/v_Grooley.png ./Labels/v_Bott.png ./Labels/v_Fisher.png ./Labels/v_Podmarsh.png ./Labels/v_Bodger.png ./Labels/v_Neckbrace.png ./Labels/v_Sunglasses.png ./Labels/v_Rule_Book.png ./Labels/v_Scientific_Tools.png ./Labels/v_Niblick.png ./Labels/v_Slosher.png ./Labels/v_Hacker.png ./Labels/v_Gravedigger.png ./Labels/v_Poker.png ./Labels/v_Skippy.png
./Labels/v_Score.png ./Labels/h_102.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_106.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_108.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_110.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_114.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/v_Nickname.png ./Labels/h_Slosher.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Hacker.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Gravedigger.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Poker.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Skippy.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/v_Gimmick.png ./Labels/h_Neckbrace.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Sunglasses.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Rule_Book.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Scientific_Tools.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
./Labels/h_Niblick.png Mark Mark Mark Mark Mark
x o blank
x o blank x o blank x o blank x o blank
x o blank x o blank x o blank x o blank
JavaScript Grid by Scott Noyes

Clues

  1. The poor old "Slosher" finished with 8 strokes more than Cyril Grooley.
  2. Thanks to some nifty wristwork on the green, "The Gravedigger" (who wasn't Gladstone Bott) came in 2 strokes under Rollo Podmarsh.
  3. "The Poker" took more strokes than the golfer who was counting on his new niblick, but fewer than Bradbury Fisher.
  4. The fellow with the annotated rulebook (not "the Gravedigger") took more strokes than the fellow with the fancy new sunglasses.
  5. Due to a traumatic triple bogey on the 18th, Rollo Podmarsh (who didn't have the rulebook) took four more strokes than "Skippy", and four fewer than the man with the neckbrace.



Solving Tips


Use an X when you are sure that two fields do not match. Use a dot when you are sure that two fields do match. Click once to place an X. Click a second time to place a dot. Click a third time to clear the box.

Select marker color by clicking the colored radio buttons. You can use colored marks to indicate which clue provided a value, or to indicate a guess that might not be correct, or just because you like solving puzzles in teal.

Use the "Save" button to save a puzzle in progress. Use the "Load" button to reload the puzzle. This feature uses cookies - fear not, we aren't tracking you or stealing credit card numbers (we couldn't, even if we wanted to.) At the moment, only one puzzle may be saved at a time on each computer (unless using different browsers or accounts). There is no warning if you save over another puzzle, and no undo!

Use the "Current Solution Window" button to parse the grid for your solution. This feature simply looks for dots in the top set of rows and creates a list that you can copy and paste into your email for submission.

If you want to clear the grid and start over, just refresh the page. Note that there is a bug in IE6 (and possibly other browsers), so that if a color other than the default is selected, that color may appear to be selected after the reload, but the actual color used will be the default.

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What would you like to see added to the JavaScript grid? Send me your requests and ideas.

Bug Reports
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Scott
ssnoyes@hotmail.com